Texas Winter Storm Resources

Texas Winter Storm Homelessness Resources

As Texans continue to experience impacts from the historic 2021 winter storm, you may be looking for ways to help your neighbors or agencies that serve those in need, or looking for help yourself. We have worked as quickly as possible to build a list of resources for service providers and individuals.

Do you see a resource or need unlisted? Please email us to let us know now!

People standing in raincoats and winter gear outside in a parking lot waiting to refill propane tanks.

Looking for ways to give?

Please click the location you’re interested in supporting to toggle organizations and funds currently on the ground helping our housed and unhoused neighbors.

Are we missing your organization? Please contact us to add you to the list of organizations needing support due to the Winter Storm now.

Are we missing your organization? Please contact us to add you to the list of organizations needing support due to the Winter Storm now.

Individual Resources

If you are in need of food in the coming days you are encouraged to dial 2-1-1 or visit 211texas.org. The service should be able to connect those in need with a wide range of services, including food, shelter, and mental health services.

Need to find a specific service in your community?
View this comprehensive index with resources divided by region thanks to @dox_gay. Additionally, view this Texas Mutual Aid Directory for more funds and services organized by region.

People in masks and sweaters sorting through clothing donations

Do you need individual FEMA Assistance?

Below the steps to apply you will find the counties that have been declared for Individual Assistance. You will also find information on how a resident can apply. Assistance can include grants for temporary housing and home repairs, low-cost loans to cover uninsured property losses, and other programs to help individuals and business owners recover from the effects of the disaster. The easiest way is on www.disasterassistance.gov  
      1. Apply with your insurance first If you have insurance). FEMA cannot duplicate benefits or services.
      2. Apply with FEMA if you have had incurred any damages.
      3. Fill out TDEM Survey. This will give the State of Texas and the local and County EM’s visibility of the amount of damage, the type of damage and visibility of how much damage in their area. They can -get this survey off of the TDEM site or the local EM website. Website link for Self-Reporting Survey (at top of page).
The President’s action makes federal funding available to affected individuals in the following counties: Angelina, Aransas, Bastrop, Bee, Bell, Bexar, Blanco, Brazoria, Brazos, Brown, Burleson, Caldwell, Calhoun, Cameron, Chambers, Collin, Comal, Comanche, Cooke, Coryell, Dallas, Denton, DeWitt, Ellis, Falls, Fort Bend, Galveston, Gillespie, Grimes, Guadalupe, Hardin, Harris, Hays, Henderson, Hidalgo, Hood, Jasper, Jefferson, Johnson, Kaufman, Kendall, Lavaca, Liberty, Madison, Matagorda, Maverick, McLennan, Montague, Montgomery, Nacogdoches, Nueces, Orange, Palo Pinto, Panola, Parker, Polk, Rockwall, Sabine, San Jacinto, San Patricio, Scurry, Shelby, Smith, Stephens, Tarrant, Travis, Tyler, Upshur, Van Zandt, Victoria, Walker, Waller, Wharton, Wichita, Williamson, Wilson, and Wise counties.

FEMA Myths

Rumors

  1. FEMA is providing $800 in food vouchers for survivors in Texas.
  2. FEMA will pay for insurance deductibles for disaster survivors.
Do not trust anyone who offers financial help and then asks for money or personal information.
    • DHS, FEMA, HHS and CDC staff never charge for disaster assistance. 
    • Federal and local disaster workers do not solicit or accept money.
    • Beware of visits, calls or emails from people claiming to be from FEMA asking for your Social Security number, bank account or other sensitive information. Giving out this type of information can lead to identify theft.

The Texas Department of Insurance is warning people to be aware of potential contracting scams as they begin making repairs. They are operating a helpline to prevent contractor scams: 800-252-3439.

Facts

  1. FEMA is not providing direct food vouchers. We are accepting applications for disaster assistance if you live in one of the 77 designated counties. Last updated February 20, 2021.

  2.  FEMA provides financial benefits to eligible applicants who are not insured or underinsured, but those benefits occur after an insurance settlement. Disaster assistance may include financial assistance for temporary lodging and home repairs, low-interest loans to cover uninsured property losses, and other programs to help individuals and business owners recover from the effects of the disaster. FEMA can’t duplicate benefits from insurance or pay your deductible. Last updated February 21, 2021.

Do you receive WIC?

Severe winter weather has impacted most of the State and Women, Infants & Children (WIC) clients who have had food destroyed can get replacement benefits during the month of February.

WIC, a special supplemental nutrition program, provides food such as bread, peanut butter, milk, eggs, cereal, and more. The program can also refer families in need to other resources such as housing assistance, health care, and financial hardship resources.

If you need replacement benefits due to destroyed food from lack of power, flooding, or other consequences of the winter storm, please contact your local office for replacement benefits.

Disaster Unemployment Assistance

The Texas Workforce Commission (TWC) is currently accepting applications for Disaster Unemployment Assistance (DUA) following February’s Winter Storm Uri. As of February 19, 2021, workers who have lost their jobs or self-employed individuals who haven’t been able to work due to damages from the storm may be eligible for DUA benefits. Learn more to understand if you’re eligible and how to apply here.

Agency Resources

Does your agency need FEMA assistance?

Below the steps to apply, you will find the counties that have been declared for Small Business Assistance. This assistance is available for private nonprofits. In the above, you will see similar steps for clients. Assistance can include grants for temporary housing and agency repairs, low-cost loans to cover uninsured property losses, and other programs to help individuals and agencies recover from the effects of the disaster. The easiest way is on www.disasterassistance.gov  

      1. Apply with your insurance first. FEMA cannot duplicate benefits or services.
      2. Apply with FEMA if you have had incurred any damages. Apply for SBA.
      3. Fill out TDEM Survey. This will give the State of Texas and the local and County EM’s visibility of the amount of damage, the type of damage and visibility of how much damage in their area. They can -get this survey off of the TDEM site or the local EM website. Website link for Self-Reporting Survey (at top of page).

The President’s action makes federal funding available to affected individuals in the following counties: Angelina, Aransas, Bastrop, Bee, Bell, Bexar, Blanco, Brazoria, Brazos, Brown, Burleson, Caldwell, Calhoun, Cameron, Chambers, Collin, Comal, Comanche, Cooke, Coryell, Dallas, Denton, DeWitt, Ellis, Falls, Fort Bend, Galveston, Gillespie, Grimes, Guadalupe, Hardin, Harris, Hays, Henderson, Hidalgo, Hood, Jasper, Jefferson, Johnson, Kaufman, Kendall, Lavaca, Liberty, Madison, Matagorda, Maverick, McLennan, Montague, Montgomery, Nacogdoches, Nueces, Orange, Palo Pinto, Panola, Parker, Polk, Rockwall, Sabine, San Jacinto, San Patricio, Scurry, Shelby, Smith, Stephens, Tarrant, Travis, Tyler, Upshur, Van Zandt, Victoria, Walker, Waller, Wharton, Wichita, Williamson, Wilson, and Wise counties.

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